EXCLUSIVE WITH LEGENDARY ACTRESS MINK STOLE: GROWING UP WITH JOHN WATERS, TO CULT ICON

MINK STOLE, THE CULT CLASSIC ACTRESS FROM BALTIMORE, IS THE MIDDLE CHILD OF TEN.  SHE BEGAN ACTING IN HER LATE TEENS WITH HER GOOD FRIEND JOHN WATERS.  MINK IS BEST KNOWN FOR HER STARRING ROLES IN THE VERY FIRST OF HIS FILMS — IN FACT, SHE’S BEEN IN JUST ABOUT EVERY FILM HE’S EVER MADE. SHE HAS AMASSED A HUGE FOLLOWING OF ADORING FANS, MYSELF INCLUDED. I WAS ABOUT 13 YEARS OLD, THE FIRST TIME I WATCHED PINK FLAMINGOS, MY FIRST OF MANY JOHN WATERS FILMS TO COME.
THE TALENTED ACTRESS, WHO PLAYED DOZENS OF MEMORABLE CHARACTERS SUCH AS PEGGY GRAVEL, CONNIE MARBLE AND OF COURSE, TAFFY DAVENPORT, INVITED DIRTY TO HER HOME IN BALTIMORE (WHICH IS LITERALLY ACROSS THE STREET FROM THE HOUSE WHERE SHE GREW UP). SEVERAL STRONG CUPS OF COFFEE LATER, SEATED IN HER DINING ROOM WITH A FAIRLY PANORAMIC VIEW OF SUBURBAN BALTIMORE, I CAME TO DISCOVER THAT MINK IS A VERY SWEET, INTELLIGENT AND SENSITIVE PERSON. SHE OPENED UP ON HER EARLY YEARS IN BALTIMORE AND THE FILMS THAT MADE HER A STAR.
TEXT Paul Bruno
PHOTOGRAPHY David Kimelman
STYLING Karen Azoulay

 

 

DIRTY:  YOU HAVE SOME GREAT ART!

MINK STOLE:  My taste in art — there is nothing on my walls that I don’t love.  Half of it came from thrift shops, half of it didn’t, and most people would be hard pressed to determine which is which.  I have a friend that only likes representational art, and it’s like, “How many barns can you look at?!”  And I really like her and her work, I have a piece of her work up, but she would NEVER put my stuff up.

 

D: AND IN PARTICULAR, WHEN IT COMES TO ART, THERE REALLY IS NO RIGHT OR WRONG, ALTHOUGH PEOPLE LOVE TO GET INTO ARGUMENTS OVER ART ALL THE TIME.

MS:  — It’s so subjective. I would probably never put something on my wall that was obscene, just because I wouldn’t real enjoy looking at it.

 

D: REALLY?

MS:  It’s not because I think it shouldn’t have happened or been created, or that no one else should have it,  everything has it’s place.

 

D:  YOU WERE BORN NANCY PAINE STOLL — WHEN AND WHERE DID THE NAME MINK COME FROM?

MS:  Well my last name is Stoll.   When I first met John Waters, and we were working on our first film together, which is something that nobody ever sees because you can’t watch it — it takes three 8mm projectors with a tape recorder to show —

 

D: BEFORE MONDO TRASHO?

MS:  Before Mondo Trasho — it was called Roman Candles.  I never really cared for the name Nancy Stoll because, first of all, it’s a double syllabary, which I think is annoying.  Now, if I had been really clever, I probably could have gone with Nancy Pain, which could have been really punk!  But I didn’t!  I ended up saying to John, “Pick me a name.”  And this was the era of the Warhol superstar, and Roman Candles being triple projected, you know, John was very influenced & inspired by those early Warhol films, Chelsea Girls in particular.  You know stars like Viva and Ingrid Superstar and Ultraviolet.  So Mink Stole was sort of obvious — and this was long before drag queens were using puns as names.
So I thought it was a cool name, I liked it.  John started introducing me to people as Mink, and people started calling me that.  I mean it really wasn’t just a stage name, it became my name.
Also, when I was born, Nancy was a very common name. It was like today’s… Jennifer.  There weren’t so many Jennifer’s when I was a child.  Jennifer was unusual.  But there was at least one other Nancy in almost every one of my classes, so having a name that was only mine, I knew who they were talking to!  But when I introduce myself to people who don’t know who I am, they’re like, “Meg?”

 

D: SO WHEN WAS THAT, WHEN YOU FIRST MET JOHN WATERS?

MS:  It was 1966.  It was in Provincetown and I was a teenager — we were both teenagers.  Well, no.  John’s a little older than I am, but we were both young!

 

D:  I KNOW YOU WERE BORN & RAISED HERE, BUT HAVE YOU ALWAYS LIVED IN BALTIMORE?

MS:  I was born and raised here, but I was gone for 30 years.  I lived in New York for a dozen years!  I lived in New York during the entire 80s.  I watched the destruction of the Upper West Side.

 

D:  WHAT A GREAT TIME TO BE IN NYC!

MS:  It was a great time to be there, but watching what was going on with the city was so depressing.  I lived on 91st street and Amsterdam, and when I moved into the neighborhood in 1979, if I had on matching socks, I was the best dressed girl in the hood!  By the time I left, which was 1989, I felt like I needed a Chanel suit to go out to the corner for a pack of cigarettes.  I really hated that.  I went to Europe for six months and left a neighborhood that I thought was still kinda on the funky side, and when I came home there were women in fur coats walking little dogs, and all new people in my building looking at me like I was street trash!  But I thought to myself, “My rent is like half of yours!”

 

D: THAT ALWAYS SEEMS TO BE THE NEW YORK STORY, YOU KNOW, HOW QUICKLY NEIGHBORHOODS CHANGE.

MS: It just flew by — and that was way before Guiliani and the renovation of Times Square.  I mean, change is inevitable, but it was just sad to me that this multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, multi-economic neighborhood with all these buildings where families had lived for generations was being torn down to build (whispers) ugly condos for rich people.

 

D:  IT’S STILL HAPPENING…

MS: Well, Manhattan is for the rich. It was ALWAYS tough to live there, but possible!  I know people living in tiny apartments, SHARING, and they seem to be okay with it.  I couldn’t do that. And then I moved to L.A., where I stayed for 18 years.

 

D: WHICH DID YOU PREFER?

MS: Well, I love Baltimore for many many reasons. I feel very grounded here. I mean, not only am I living directly across the street from the house I grew up in, which, if you could crawl back into the womb, I kind of did! The person that lives behind me, I’ve known since I was a child.  The boy next door when I was growing up lives around the corner.  And the neighborhood has not visually changed since I was born.

 

D: THIS IS MY FIRST TIME IN BALTIMORE, BUT DRIVING HERE, LOOKING AT THE HOUSES, I COULD SENSE THOSE EARLY FILMS, THE AESTHETIC IS STILL INTACT.

MS: Not far from here is where Serial Mom was shot.  I had someone not too long ago that this was city living! City living to me, is New York — and even L.A..  I love Baltimore, but it doesn’t have the resources of those cities, which is unfortunate. You know, there’s no fabric district, no flower district, there’s no Chinatown.  If you’re looking for fabric, you’re very limited here — you can get your polyester from Joanne’s, but there is very little variety — and not everything needs to be high-end!  I miss those things about city living.  I miss the  sunny winters of L.A..  The grayness that we have for a good part of the winter is difficult for me. I also miss a great many people; I made some really great friends in L.A., and worked with some wonderful musicians that I wish I had access to.  I mean I work with great musicians here, but I would love to bring some of my west coast musicians and my east coast musicians together, and I’m not really able to do that.

 

….

 

D:  SINCE WE’RE ON THE SUBJECT TELL ME ABOUT HOW YOU GOT INTO MUSIC, AS SOME PEOPLE MAY NOT BE AWARE YOU HAVE A BAND.

MS:  Well my first band was in L.A., and that started when a friend of mine named Brian Grillo (SP), who used to be with a band called Extra Fancy, came to see a Shakespeare play I was doing (I was doing A Winter’s Tale with the L.A. Women’s Shakespeare Company). I played the singing peddler, and I had to sing!  And he came and heard me sing and said, “I didn’t know you could sing!” I didn’t really consider myself a singer, I was just doing what the part called for. Anyway, he had written a song and was putting together one of these Sunday afternoon beer busts, at a leather club in Silverlake (SP), and he asked me if I would perform the song for him. He got me a guitar player, a bassist, and an electric violin player to accompany me, so I sang the song… and the crowd went crazy, people were screaming for more, and I was like, “I don’t have anymore!  I’ll sing it again though!”  And so I sang it again and it was just so much fun.
The electric violin player didn’t want to play with me anymore because the bartender didn’t give her any free drinks that night.  I mean I got her a drink that night, but because the bartender didn’t offer her one without my intervention, her nose was a bit out of joint!  But Brian introduced me to some other musicians, and we put together a little band and did some more of these beer bust gigs.  Then one day we were doing a gig at Tom of Finland day at this leather bar and it was really really hot, and by the time we got up to play nobody cared because I was a girl.  You know earlier in the day no one would have minded, but by the end of the night, all they were interested in was getting some. It was time — who am I going home with time, and that wasn’t me!  I mean I’ve learned that my welcome in gay bars runs out after a certain hour!

 

D: THE GAY AGENDA!

MS: Yes!  Suddenly the agenda shifts, and I am suddenly no longer remotely interesting. I mean, I don’t mind this, I mean I think it’s sad that gay men are so… focused, but it’s not for me to judge.  I mean I couldn’t change it regardless of how I feel, but all of a sudden warmth turns to chill and then it’s time for me to go.  When I’m really good, I try to get out before that happens.
Anyway, that was the day my bass player fell in love, and that was also the day I learned that I needed a drummer! (laughs) The weird part about doing these performances at my age and already being known to a certain extent, is that I was bad!  You have to learn it, you have to develop your skills, and I was learning in public, on stage!  Because that’s the only place that you can. People would come up to me and say how great I was, but I didn’t think it was.  I’d be grateful and thankful because it’s rude to deny a compliment, but I knew it wasn’t. I knew that they were really being nice.  It’s hard to have to learn in public!  Artists, for instance, get to paint in private, and only show the ones that they like.  Photographers get to discard the photos that don’t turn out.  But performing can only be learned on stage.

 

D: YOU NEED THAT REACTION FROM THE CROWD.

MS: You have to have it.

 

D:  I WOULD IMAGINE THAT YOU BECOME VERY SENSITIVE TO THE AUDIENCE’S REACTION?

MS:  It was exhilarating and painful. And exhilarating and painful.  But worth pursuing.  Of course, various people came to see us play — I was really lucky the day that I met Christian Hoffman (SP), who was an extraordinary musician, and without even knowing his pedigree, I said, “I need a keyboard player, come play with us,” to which he agreed. And then I found out who he was, and that he played with Klaus Nomi & the Mumps, and he had all this history, and we got along fabulously.  He was wonderful to work with.  He is one of the musicians that I would love to bring over here. It may be possible.  I’m getting ready to do some  fundraising, so if I get enough money together I will bring him.

 

D:  EVERYTHING IS POSSIBLE!

MS: Yes, it is. I’m putting a few songs that he wrote on the album, so even if I can’t have his playing, I can have his music.

 

D:  YOU’RE WORKING ON AN ALBUM RIGHT NOW?

MS: I am, yes! I will have to do some fundraising to finish it, because it’s taking way longer than any of us anticipated, and I don’t want it to be bad!  I want it to be really good, and in order to do it well, it takes time.

 

D: ARE YOU YOUR OWN WORST JUDGE?

MS: Yes and no. It’s very hard for me to be totally objective, but I am probably more objective than many other people might be.  I can tell when I sound good.  I can tell when I sound bad. But I don’t listen to myself sounding good and say, “Wow, that really sucks.”  I can tell when it’s better.  I’ve found what works for me is to replay a track I recorded and listen to it time and again, because it’s the only way you can really hear it.  I’ve learned over and over that what feels REALLY GOOD on stage, sounds really shitty!  The experience is like, “That felt so good, I know it must have been really brilliant!” but the reality is often very different.
So yes, I am a harsh critic, I always want it to be better, but I’m not going to beat myself up.  Although I must say, and this is probably true for most performers, 99% of the show can be fantastic, and that 1% that you either missed a lyric, or screw up in some other way, that’s what haunts you.  But that’s the kind of musician I want to work with, the one that remembers that 1% and works harder.

 

D:  GETTING BACK TO YOUR ACTING CAREER, I WAS CURIOUS IF YOU HAD ANY PROFESSIONAL TRAINING, OR WAS IT MORE OF A SITUATION THAT YOU THREW YOURSELF INTO, LIKE YOUR MUSIC?

MS:  I was thrown into it!  It was basically like, “Hey guys, let’s make a movie,” which was one of the things that made us fabulous, and one of the things that we got kicked around about, I mean we were often called amateurs. OFTEN! And it really pissed me off, because we may have been untrained, but we were not unprofessional. We showed up on time, we knew our lines, we did our jobs.  There are many levels of professionalism, and when it came to work product, we did not take drugs on set, we did not drink on set, we did not ad-lib our lines, we didn’t fuck up our lines.  That would make John mad, and you didn’t want to make John mad!

 

D: SO THERE WAS NO ROOM FOR IMPROVISATION?

MS: We never improvised — we weren’t allowed!

 

D: I THINK PART OF THE BRILLIANCE OF JOHN WATERS’ SCRIPTS ARE THE ABSURD LINES AND THE CONTRADICTION BETWEEN THESE VERY ECCENTRIC, IRREGULAR, OFTEN TRASHY CHARACTERS, WHO ARE SPEAKING INCREDIBLY ELOQUENTLY AND PRETENTIOUSLY!  THESE HILARIOUS, BUT LONG AND SEEMINGLY DIFFICULT TO MEMORIZE LINES!

MS: Especially for Edith Massey! (laughs)  Poor Edith!  She had so much trouble with them, I mean it was hard for her because she didn’t even know what she was saying half the time, and she would try so hard!
There was actually one scene in Desperate Living that I improvised on demand where John said, “I didn’t write anything for this scene so just make something up,” and I was like, “WHAT?!!!  I don’t know how to do that, I never did that!” I obviously had to though, when Peggy Gravel was concocting her rabies potion she says something like “a pinch of bat, a touch of rat,” I made those lines up.  But generally, the lines were very specific.  Over the years, and in the more recent films, John relaxed a bit, because he had more assistance.  A script supervisor, and a first and second A.D., to whom he could delegate.  But when it was John and only John, and maybe the lighting guy and the camera man, he had to have absolute control.  I mean, he’s kind of a control freak — IN THE NICEST POSSIBLE WAY!  I mean I love John, I have no bad words about John.  But he had to keep control!  I mean, he was also the driver!  He used to come pick me up from my mother’s house!  When I met him we were both still living at home.  That’s how young we were.  We grew up together.

 

D: THAT’S WHAT I FIND AMAZING AND INSPIRING ABOUT IT — IT WAS SOMETHING THAT YOU WERE ALL INSPIRED BY AND WANTED TO DO.

MS: It was more fun than anything else that was going on!

 

D:  YOU GUYS CAME TO BE KNOWN, ALL THE EARLY DREAMLAND FILMS PLAYERS, FOR HAVING VERY FEW INHIBITIONS: SEX SCENES WITH LIVE CHICKENS, GETTING SHOT WITH A PISTOL IN THE ASS, GETTING NUDE, OR IN OUTRAGEOUS COSTUMES — WAS THERE EVER ANYTHING THAT JOHN ASKED YOU TO DO BACK IN THE DAY THAT YOU ABSOLUTELY REFUSED TO DO?

MS:  There was just one thing, for me anyway.  In Pink Flamingos, he wanted me to set my hair on fire.  When he first asked me, I had just broken up with my boyfriend, we were in Provincetown, I said, sure, why not; it’ll be fun.  And he held me to it! However, when the time came, and we were actually going to do this, I started to have second thoughts. Here is what was going to happen: I was going to be sitting in chair, and somebody was going to light a match to my head, while somebody else would be ready with a bucket of water— none of these people were professional stunt people by the way! And I wasn’t supposed to react. I was supposed to sit there while my hair was burning, and do nothing. Mind you, my hair was so processed, it was bleached white, and then inked. I mean it was so flimsy, and with one take and one take only to do this!  Plus, at the end of the movie, Divine eats dog shit!  Nobody would have remembered anyhow! I could have been bald for the rest of my life over a completely forgettable moment!  But I was more concerned about the fact that as a person I was not going to be able to pull it off — to not react as someone lit a match to my hair!  Ooooh, but he was not happy. He was not happy!
We have both agreed, in recent years, although I always knew that it was a bad idea, that I made the right decision.

 

D: HOW WAS IT SUPPOSED TO FUNCTION IN THE PLOT OF THE FILM?

MS:  Oh, I forget!  I think somebody was supposed to yell, “Liar liar, hair on fire!” probably Divine, at some point after David & I set the trailer on fire, I mean I don’t have an original script, unfortunately.  They were hand written.  These were the days before Xerox. We’re old!

 

D: AND BEFORE DIGITAL FILMING!

MS: OH MY GOD YES! Everything was film!

 

….

 

D: DID YOU GUYS DO TONS OF REHEARSALS BEFORE STARTING TO FILM?

MS: In the early days, we would get together and film on weekends, and pick a night or two during the week   I mean during Pink Flamingos, we didn’t have any idea how the film was going to end! We didn’t have a fill script when we started.  During the filming of that movie, John and I lived together, we lived in the Marble’s house—

 

D: WAS THAT PIT OF A BASEMENT WHERE CONNIE AND RAYMOND MARBLE KEPT THEIR KIDNAPPED HITCHHIKERS REALLY A PART OF THE HOUSE?

MS: NO! That pit was actually sort of the basement of the house that we would use as a base when we were filming at the trailer.  You never saw the house that the basement was a part of.

 

D: DID YOU ALWAYS KNOW THAT YOU WANTED TO BE A PERFORMER?  DID GROWING UP ONE OUT OF TEN CHILDREN HAVE ANYTHING TO DO WITH THAT?

MS:  I think your childhood has to do with everything.  I don’t know that specifically being one of ten had anything to do with it.  I was always looking for attention, and usually getting it very negatively.  I was a histrionic child. Everything was huge! And mostly everything was bad — I was not happy. I don’t think that it was necessary to have an unhappy childhood to be creative — I don’t think it hurts though!  I think people who peak in high school are the sad ones.  So it’s fine that I was not a happy kid. When I look back on it, it doesn’t seem as dreadful. Now, it’s harder for me to remember all the bad parts, which is lovely because it used to be all I remembered!
Part of coming home was releasing myself from the childhood memories, because I live here!  This is the scene of all the crimes, and yet I am living here happily!  By coming home I have wiped those bad slates clean, and I hadn’t really thought about it until now!  Thank you so much for that catharsis!

 

D: I’LL BE SENDING YOU A BILL.

MS: It’ll cross in the mail with mine!

 

D: WHEN YOU GUYS WERE MAKING THESE EARLY FILMS, DID YOU EVER STOP AND THINK ABOUT WHERE YOU GUYS MIGHT END UP?

MS: No.  Maybe John did — John was the ambition.  He was the driving force and the creator, but he was also very lucky to know people who would go along with him! And we were all lucky to be able to go! (laughs) It was a symbiotic relationship, but John was the engine that drove the train, and John always wanted to be famous.  I wouldn’t have dared dream of being famous — I was terrified, a small town girl! And like I said, being one of ten kids, I was so insecure! I mean to me, low self esteem was conceit! I had to really work hard over the years to build up any self confidence at all because I had none going into all of this.  So for me, the idea one day I would get emails from strangers thanking me for something I did 30 years ago was completely unimaginable. It happens all the time and it still really thrills and moves me.  I am really humbled by it — I don’t take any of that for granted.
Plus, to be honest, all of the attention was on Divine! If Divine was in the room, nobody saw me!  While Divine was getting huge amounts of attention and getting to be on stage with Elton John and Grace Jones, nobody was calling for me.  Which was… tough at times!  But I begrudge Divine none of it, Divine worked very very hard.

 

D: DIVINE WAS AMAZING!

MS: Amazing!  And a really hard worker, and a generous performer.  I worked with Divine on stage as well, and I loved working with him because he was focused, and talented…. (puts on child’s voice) BUT I WAS TOO AND NO ONE WAS LOOKING AT ME! He totally eclipsed me.  All eyes were on Divine, although I did hold my own on screen!

 

D:  WHEN DID IT FINALLY HIT YOU THAT ALL THAT CREATIVE WORK AS TEENAGERS HAD SUCH A MAJOR PAYOFF?

MS: It was about twelve years ago.  It wasn’t the first time somebody ever said, “love your work,” but my friend Peaches Christ invited me to be his first live celebrity guest on a show he had been doing for years called Midnight Mass.  I got there and was standing in the back of the theater waiting for Peaches to call me on stage and I see an animatronic figure of me as Peggy Gravel stirring rabies potion that I have no idea how he had made!  Someone had also put together a film montage of clips of my scenes from the movies, and when I walked onto that stage I received a standing ovation, and I nearly burst into tears.  It was totally mind-blowing to me! And it was really great because it was the encouragement that I needed to go on and start doing one-woman shows, it helped me when I was putting the band together and starting to do shows.  It was an amazing moment in my life.

 

D: HOW DID ANNE BAXTER DESCRIBE IT IN ALL ABOUT EVE?  “WAVES OF LOVE COMING FROM THE FLOODLIGHTS” (FACT CHECK)

MS: Yes! And it was the firsts time I had ever gotten that.  I mean it wasn’t the first time anyone had ever given me applause, I had done plays and stage work, blah blah blah blah blah.  But this was the first time that the applause was all about me.  It was just me walking on stage!  It was like HELLO WORLD!

 

D:  CAN I ASK YOU HOW YOUR FAMILY REACTED TO THOSE EARLY FILMS?

MS: Oh, they hated it. They truly hated it.  And my mother, from who I got my histrionic bent, totally believed that this was all intended to make her life hell… but that was just a side benefit.  That was just a perk. She used to see me..  (shudders) she used to make me crazy… well, what I looked like back then!  I was wearing black nail polish, I had hair the color of a Raggedy-Anne doll.  There was one time, and I just have to laugh thinking about it:  it was around the time of Multiple Maniacs so I didn’t have the orange hair.  I played multiple parts in multiple maniacs, and I was getting dressed for the scene where I was meant to be an audience member, and I put on this little blonde wig and this sweet dress and I was just like… BLEGH!  But my mother thought I looked, “so pretty!  Why don’t you look like that all the time?”  They really were not happy with the whole thing.  To this day I have a sister who really can’t…  I mean she is very supportive and comes to my shows but she has a hard time with a lot of it.  I don’t think she’s seen a lot of my films.
My mother came to see my first film, Roman Candles, and she was appalled. So she didn’t see another one until Polyester. Which was fine!  She didn’t need to see all of that!  It only would have upset her, and I wasn’t out to upset her.  I mean my very existence upset her, and the fact that people knew that I was her daughter upset her.  I mean people would come and tell her that they saw me in this movie — and most of those people liked the films!  But she was still just mortified.  She was a good democratic woman, but she was socially conservative.  She was ,”what will the neighbors think,” conservative. But now, everybody’s fine!  I still don’t expect them to go back and watch Pink Flamingos.

 

D: DO YOU?

MS: (Sarcastically Grandiose) Yes, I sit in a darkened room and watch all my old films by myself, like Norma Desmond. NO! I will watch them if I can’t get out of it.  Next weekend I’m hosting a double showing of Pink Flamingos and Female Trouble, and what I’ll do is introduce it and then I’ll leave.  Sometimes I’ll watch it.  I watched Pink Flamingos last summer when I was in Austin with Peaches (Christ) and they were showing it at the Alamo Draft House, and it was this theater that’s a restaurant, and they wait on you as you watch the movie, and I was sitting in this balcony with all this food and liquor — and for me Pink Flamingos is like home movies!  And I’m the only one left alive!

 

D: THAT WAS MY NEXT QUESTION!

MS: One of the kidnapped girls in the pit is still alive, Channing, the butler, is still alive; he lives in Provincetown.  Cookie’s gone, Divine is gone, Edith’s gone, David’s gone.

 

D: AND MARY?

MS: Mary Vivien Pierce is still alive actually. She lives in Nicaragua, but she has had many physical problems.  I mean I’m not only alive and healthy and still functioning! (Knocks on dining table)  I feel incredibly blessed.  And I hate to use the word blessed because it sounds religious and I’m not.  But I feel incredibly lucky, I feel like I have had a lot of good fortune. And I was blessed with good genes. It’s the only reason I’m sorry I didn’t reproduce, and it’s a valid reason because I came from really good stock.

 

D: SO WHAT PROJECTS ARE YOU WORKING ON AT THE MOMENT, ASIDE FROM WORKING ON AN ALBUM?

MS: I just got back from L.A.  I went out to work on Eating Out 4 & 5.  They’re just wrapping up — they’re shooting booth at once, with the same cast.  You know, it’s the gay coming of age story of a boy coming out.  Casey, (played by Daniel Skelton) the pretty, young, sweet, no-hair-on-chest boy. They’re big on that! I can’t tell you that much about them, of course.  They’re sort of formulaic, but they’re sweet stories and I can say that my character gets a boy toy in the next ones.  I get a very pretty boy toy!  Aunt Helen gets some!

 

D: WHAT KIND OF MUSIC DO YOU LIKE LISTENING TO?  WHO ARE SOME OF MINK STOLE’S FAVES?

MS: I listen to the classics. The holy trio: Ella Fitzgerald, Dinah Washington and Sarah Vaughn.  And Billie Holiday & Peggy Lee. I like vocalists.  I like K.D. Lang, Willie Nelson and Tony Bennett.  My favorite album rite now is Sade’s new album! She has an amazing voice and she has very good people working with her. The arrangements are stellar.  They’re smooth and they’re easy, and they’re not overproduced.

 

D: SO I TAKE IT YOU’RE NOT A JENNIFER LOPEZ FAN?

MS: I’m not not a Jennifer Lopez fan! You know, I only have so much time in the day! (Laughs) Periodically I’ll put my Pandora on Lady Gaga, just so I can know what’s going on in music, but I can’t tell the difference between her and Rihanna and Ke$ha.  They all sound fairly alike to me.  I wouldn’t know an Eminem song if I fell on it.  The BeeGees and Abba for getting housework done are fabulous.

 

MINK STOLE AT WORK


Mink Stole as Peggy Gravel in John Waters’ DESPERATE LIVING

 

Mink Stole as Taffy Davenport in John Waters’ FEMALE TROUBLE

 

Mink Stole and Kathleen Turner in a scene from John Waters’ SERIAL MOM

 

 

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